contests, on the grind

That pub’ life: Publishers Marketplace #AuthorToolboxBlogHop #blog #Wednesday #amwriting

Querying writers, listen up! You’ve probably got a handful of go-to online resources that allow you to obsess, internet-stalk, and hyper-analyze literary agents’ actions that might reveal your odds of getting signed.

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Well, have you checked out Publishers Marketplace? This month’s Author Toolbox Blog Hop post (brainchild of my critique partner and marketing extraordinaire Raimey Gallant) is devoted to my favorite publishing resource, and with also a tiny, teeny, squinch of self-serving.

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Last month I mentioned that I achieved one of my crazy-head-spinning, life goals of getting a literary agent! But, not just any agent. A total dreamboat, in-my-wildest-dreams agent, Jill Marr of the Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency! *cue squees*

Then, thanks to her ninja agent skillzzz, three months later I had a 2-book publishing deal with Thomas & Mercer!! ‘Surreal’ doesn’t begin to describe my summer or my feelings of epic joy.

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I would not have known that Jill was my dream-agent or that Thomas & Mercer was my dream publisher, had I not been clued in to Publishers Marketplace. This platform contains publishing data across the entire industry: agent, publisher, publishing advance, projected publishing date, editor, history of deals and ergo likelihood of future deals. All the way around, Publishers Marketplace allowed me to best strategize what agents I would query, and which publishers I would follow.

As a major proponent of Twitter pitch contests, I believe a querying writer MUST know the agents to whom she is querying. There are so many vanity publishers out there, trying to make a buck (or several hundred) off of beginning-writers who might not be aware of the pitfalls. Publishers Marketplace allows us to figure out who is selling, who is working hard to sell, and who hasn’t sold books in years, to whom we can then entrust our manuscripts.

In a nutshell, Publishers Marketplace comes at a cost ($25 per month) but it’s worth it. If you’re not ready to query, you can afford to hold off. Or, you can be like me, and check it for years before you actually get a pub deal, for inspiration and motivation, to reassure yourself that one day you too will be listed in your own little PM blurb.

 

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“Debut author Elle Marr’s THE PARIS TWIN, in which a woman receives a call that her identical twin has been murdered and travels to Paris to collect her belongings, but there she finds a note: “Alive. Trust no one.”, to Megha Parekh at Thomas & Mercer, at auction, in a two-book deal, by Jill Marr at Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency (world).”

For more educational and motivational blog posts check out the Author Toolbox Blog Hop lineup, here.

Are you looped in to Publishers Marketplace? What do you consult for big-dreams-writing motivation?

22 thoughts on “That pub’ life: Publishers Marketplace #AuthorToolboxBlogHop #blog #Wednesday #amwriting”

  1. That’s MY critique partner, everyone! Hands off! jk jk jk. 🙂 I’m so pumped about your deal, and I can’t wait to read the galley/ARC/whatever, just gimme, gimme, gimme. I am now a paying member of Publishers Marketplace, I should also mention. I kind of wish the price was more accessible for authors around the world, but it’s worth it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Totally agree! Even if you pay in advance (for months in bulk) you only save something like 7%. I guess PM knows it’s pretty indispensable to the publishing industry..? Can’t wait to send you ARCs in ooooh a year?! 🙂

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  2. Congratulations on getting an agent and a book deal! That’s fantastic!

    You make a great point with this line: “a querying writer MUST know the agents to whom she is querying.”

    I read some agent blogs, and so many of them have wannabe writers wasting their time by pitching the wrong stories – picture books to adult fiction agents, erotica to Christian agents, fiction to non-fiction agents. On the other side of the coin are authors crying that they keep getting rejected. They need to read this post!

    Like

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